PhenoGenoRoses: modern breeding techniques

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jAc123
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2021 1:46 pm

PhenoGenoRoses: modern breeding techniques

Post: # 73192Post jAc123
Sat Jul 31, 2021 4:38 pm

Hi everybody!
I was wondering if anybody has any experience with roses bred by PhenoGenoRoses. As shown by the company name, their goal (and their breeding technique) is to incorporate in the classic rose breeding techniques, based on the observation of the phenotype, the study of the plants genotype to produce better garden plants. As far as I know, their plants are not available yet in the USA, but they can easily be found in the EU. At the moment they have presented 9 roses collections:
- Taste of Love (Edible roses, bred specifically for the gastronomic use of their petals)
- New Fashion (colorful, easy-to-care compact shrubs, specifically bred for small urban gardens)
- Mella (floriferous shrubs with single to semi-double blooms, perfect for attracting bees and butterflies)
- Fragrant Frayla (shrub roses with fragrant, OGR style blooms in a variety of colours)
- Winterjewel (shrub roses with semi-double or fully double blooms, bred to withstand low winter temperatures at least to -35°C/-30°F. That should be USDA zone 3b/4a)
- Abundant Reka (compact shrub varieties, bred specifically for their continuous blooming)
- Art Vaza (a collection of shrub and HT varieties bred specifically for their use as cut flowers, without neglecting their value as garden plants)
- Pixie (patio and miniature varieties with dense, compact growth and continuous flowers)
- Striped Freska (shrub and HT with striped flowers in different shapes, both classic HT and OGR blooms)

I personally extremely interesting and fascinating their breeding techniques and I think they can really obtain outstanding results this way. I'm particularly interested in their Taste of Love collection, not only for their use in recipes, but also because the cultivation of plants for a culinary use requires double, fragrant blooms with thick petals and disease resistant plants that do not require the use of chemicals.
Of course their breeding techniques requires way more time, knowledge and founding that most of us amateurs can use, but it is definitely interesting

If anyone have any experience with it, let me know. I've ordered 7 of theirs plants for this winter and I'll try "playing" with them next spring

I'll leave you their website link if anyone want to give it a look. They've published many papers about rose breeding, but several of them are too difficult for my high-school level biology knowledge and will require me further studies, but they're surely interesting and can be useful if you have the knowledge to fully understand them.

https://phenogenoroses.com/rose-breeding/research/

Giessen
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:32 pm
Location: Austria

Re: PhenoGenoRoses: modern breeding techniques

Post: # 73221Post Giessen
Fri Aug 13, 2021 9:29 am

On my opinion, the marketing strategy for merely ‚edible‘ roses goes a bit in a delusive direction, because all roses are in fact edible. What about breeding strategy – they probably use chips based on QTL mapping to select for desirable loci in parents and in progeny, the strategy which is unreachable for the rest of breeders who have no knowledge in modern molecular genetics and no big budgets, and this is probably driven mainly by private companies having both money and agressive marketing.

jAc123
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2021 1:46 pm

Re: PhenoGenoRoses: modern breeding techniques

Post: # 73254Post jAc123
Tue Aug 24, 2021 3:54 pm

Giessen wrote:
Fri Aug 13, 2021 9:29 am
On my opinion, the marketing strategy for merely ‚edible‘ roses goes a bit in a delusive direction, because all roses are in fact edible. What about breeding strategy – they probably use chips based on QTL mapping to select for desirable loci in parents and in progeny, the strategy which is unreachable for the rest of breeders who have no knowledge in modern molecular genetics and no big budgets, and this is probably driven mainly by private companies having both money and agressive marketing.
Hi Giessen! I'm sorry if I didn't answer earlier but I was on vacation abroad.

Talking about the Edible Roses collection you are quite right and I think that the word 'culinary' may be more precise (even thought it may be a marketing strategy to make the buyers think the other varieties are not). Even so, these varieties are particularly good for a kitchen use: they have been tested for their vitamins, antioxidants and nutrients elements and have been selected for their flavour and texture. Varieties used for a culinary use also have to be suitable for organic growing, they should have a high petal number and their flowers should be durable if refrigerated (according to their websites, they last for about 10 days).

I totally agree about the fact that their breeding technique is not suitable for amateur breeders, but I think that their roses could be a good starting point for further breeding

They have for sure a quite high budget for their studies, but I don't see yet an aggressive marketing programme (even though in Europe we can not talk about really aggressive marketing programmes, maybe excluding Meilland and Austin)

Giessen
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:32 pm
Location: Austria

Re: PhenoGenoRoses: modern breeding techniques

Post: # 73264Post Giessen
Sat Aug 28, 2021 1:35 pm

I agree, they can be a good starting point for breeding, like any other good rose. The fact that they are bred using molecular techniques does not mean that they have any special features which would allow to break genetic laws and let the progeny inherit only best traits.
What about vitamins or so ever - they maybe tested their own varieties, yes, but all other roses (how many are out there?) went untested, so which levels do those have? Maybe 2x higher? Anyway, their roses can’t differ from the others very much, it is still the same species and even in terms of genetics the modern roses are not very diverse. In addition, based on cultivation conditions (soil, watering, sun hours, climate an so on) the measured levels will somehow differ anyway. Will it really play the role for a customer then? So, this “measuring” is another commercial thrick, nothing else, I think.

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