Hesperhodos experiment

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roseseek
Posts: 5197
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 6:54 pm
Location: Zone 9b Central California, Sunset Zone 15

Hesperhodos experiment

Post: # 72299Post roseseek
Tue Nov 03, 2020 4:39 pm

I have played with Stellata mirifica and Minutifolia for many years. It appears I have finally succeeded in combining the two. The stigma disk is deep in the Mirifca ovary. I've attempted pollinating it using my finger with no success, so this year, I employed the small paint brush technique. Remembering Ralph Moore's statements about his wondering if some of his wilder crosses never succeeded may have been due to using too little pollen, I DROWNED several Mirifica blooms in Minutifolia pollen. Not simply dried anthers, but actual, literal pollen. Because the Mexican form of Minutifolia is the one which reliably sets hips and appears to be the form which has resulted in producing my Minutifolia hybrids with modern minis, I concentrated on using a mixture of pollen from Pure Bea, the white Mexican form and the UC Berkeley Mexican form selection. Fortunately, both species continue flowering for me as long as they are provided water, so I can continue attempting the cross as long as I desire. It seems to have finally worked! Pure Bea is out of flower at this moment, but the Berkeley selection is flowering.
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This is Stellata mirifica with hips bursting full of seeds resulting from Minutifolia pollen. Mirifica hasn't set many self set hips for me. The only other time I obtained self set seed from it which resulted in actual seedlings was the one year in Encino where the one surviving seedling is now named Puzzlement. https://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=2.69411 The only neighboring rose to it was Fedtschenkoana, and the physical traits of the rose appear to support that presumption. I'm eager to grow these seeds! I discovered that Minutifolia self seedlings are highly susceptible to mildew. All of the earlier Minutifolia self seedlings I've raised have died from the fungus. Perhaps I should break down and use a safe fungicide on these to help prevent their loss? The hairs on the seeds seem as if they are meant to stick to animal fur for distribution. A really odd characteristic of Mirifica is the stench of the hip interior. It smells like Valerian Root, nearly "old, stinky sneaker". The hips are bursting with seeds!
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Kim
California Central Coast
USDA Zone 9b
Sunset Zone 15
Cooler inland coastal valley with strong marine influence

pacificjade
Posts: 754
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2011 12:15 am

Re: Hesperhodos experiment

Post: # 72300Post pacificjade
Tue Nov 03, 2020 5:30 pm

I saw your pics on HMF this morning.

My first thought: "omg its so fuzzzzzzzy~" lol

I think one of the genetic potentials of roses like this, as well as a few others, is that their internodes are very dense, even compared to Rosa wichurana, which could translate well into moderns. Another genetic potential is the expenditure of genetic material for growing ranges. There is partial overlap for cold hardiness in roses with heat tolerance. This is because they tend to share polygenetic overlap with stress tolerance.

Don
Posts: 1877
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm

Re: Hesperhodos experiment

Post: # 72303Post Don
Wed Nov 04, 2020 8:49 am

Very interesting. Very, very rare,do whatever it takes to keep them alive.
What doesn't kill them makes them stronger.

roseseek
Posts: 5197
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 6:54 pm
Location: Zone 9b Central California, Sunset Zone 15

Re: Hesperhodos experiment

Post: # 72308Post roseseek
Thu Nov 05, 2020 2:54 pm

Thank you. That's my intention. I hope to be able to use the results from these seedlings with the L56Min2 and L56Puzzle lines. Who knows where they may lead? Thankfully, it's the journey that provides the fun!
Kim
California Central Coast
USDA Zone 9b
Sunset Zone 15
Cooler inland coastal valley with strong marine influence

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