Culling

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sarahconeill
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:01 pm
Location: Seattle, USDA-8b, Sunset-5

Culling

Post: # 68988Post sarahconeill
Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:57 pm

Do you have photos of your ugly culled plants? I've read the booklets cover to cover, but I could use some visuals here. I'm preparing to do my first culling of my second year plants that are in pots this spring (once winter has done some of the work for me). I already have some amorphous goals, but I'm working on hardening my heart!

Karl K
Posts: 1368
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 4:49 pm

Re: Culling

Post: # 68991Post Karl K
Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:13 pm

I once had a bunch of seedlings from an odd cross that were showing signs of mildew ... and rust.

I remembered Burbank's comment about culling any seedling that showed a trace of infection, and started pulling.

But then I remembered the rest of Burbank's comment ... that his roses had no Rosa foetida in their lineage because the first generation seedlings failed the disease-resistance test.

So, I quickly replanted my seedlings.

I regard weird crosses as exploratory. I didn't really expect anything worth introducing from a cross of 'Perle d'Or' and 'Goldmoss'. And all I got was an odd little thing I called 'Tan Moss', even though there was very little moss. I just wanted to know what a moss rose with a long pedicel might look like. Now I do.
http://bulbnrose.x10.mx/Roses/Rose_Pict ... nmoss.html

mntlover
Posts: 293
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2018 7:11 pm

Re: Culling

Post: # 68999Post mntlover
Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:28 pm

I don't have any pictures from the seedlings I have been tracking for the last two years. Without doubt I need to harden my heart more and clear some out. I think it depends much upon what your goals are and if a seedling can be used as a step in that direction or not. No doubt some I am watching are just too week of growers and should be culled. I haven't had any weird growth....yet.
Maybe some of those who have done this for a while or deal with a larger amount of seedlings could help with the process of narrowing down to a few, no doubt they have had to learn it over the years.
Good luck!

jbergeson
Posts: 1420
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 11:54 pm

Re: Culling

Post: # 69001Post jbergeson
Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:34 pm

Weak growers and stingy bloomers should probably be culled first, especially if rebloom is a priority of yours.

After that, follow your heart. It is this process of selection that, generation after generation, shapes your roses into something that mirrors your personality.

philip_la
Posts: 1079
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 10:28 pm

Re: Culling

Post: # 69015Post philip_la
Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:51 am

"It is this process of selection that, generation after generation, shapes your roses into something that mirrors your personality."

A rose in declining health with a higher sense of self-worth than it merits, which deals with life by having a sense of humor about it.

That sounds pretty accurate.
Philip F.
Zone 8 / Sunset Zn 30 (Austin, TX -- formerly New Orleans, LA)

Plazbo
Posts: 191
Joined: Tue May 09, 2017 12:18 am

Re: Culling

Post: # 69017Post Plazbo
Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:03 pm

If you have the space and time and there isn't any obvious reason to cull a plant...there isn't any harm in keeping it around. Eventually you'll reach a point where you either use it in breeding or not and if you don't you'll probably reach the conclusion it's time to let it go to make room. Culling becomes a lot more focused when space is an issue.

There isn't really a right or wrong way to cull, there's just what works for you and what goals/outcomes you're trying to achieve which is likely a bit different for everyone.

jbergeson wrote:
Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:34 pm
Weak growers and stingy bloomers should probably be culled first, especially if rebloom is a priority of yours.
In general I agree but there's potential exceptions to the rule there. I mean it's feasible to take a weak grower and cross that with a species/near species and produce vigorous offspring, granted if you're doing that the weak grower needs to be quite special in other area's.

Karl K
Posts: 1368
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 4:49 pm

Re: Culling

Post: # 69089Post Karl K
Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:16 pm

Plazbo wrote:
Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:03 pm
In general I agree but there's potential exceptions to the rule there. I mean it's feasible to take a weak grower and cross that with a species/near species and produce vigorous offspring, granted if you're doing that the weak grower needs to be quite special in other area's.
Your comment rang a bell.
All About Miniature Roses (1967)
Ralph S. Moore
Another "key" in unlocking the treasure chest of better miniatures was a very dark red seedling made by crossing Oakington Ruby with Floradora. This red seedling is not worth keeping if we were to judge it by its flowers. Its form is not too good, the dark color burns in hot sun, the plant is too large (nearly a climber), it is female sterile, and pollen is not plentiful. But what offspring it produces!
http://bulbnrose.x10.mx/Roses/breeding/Moore/MOORE.html
That would count as "special".

And if you find a seedling with sky-blue flowers, don't cull it just because of a little mildew.

roseseek
Posts: 5245
Joined: Sun Dec 11, 2011 6:54 pm
Location: Zone 9b Central California, Sunset Zone 15

Re: Culling

Post: # 69091Post roseseek
Wed Jan 23, 2019 8:05 pm

Little Buckaroo was the most notable of the seven results.
Kim
California Central Coast
USDA Zone 9b
Sunset Zone 15
Cooler inland coastal valley with strong marine influence

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