foliage oddity

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shoy
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm

foliage oddity

Post: # 62605Post shoy
Wed Nov 25, 2015 3:10 pm

Early this growing season I noticed an unusual shoot on my plant of Paul Ecke, Jr. Stems and leaves were creamy yellow with no green at all. New growth normally has a reddish tint and that characteristic is still observable on this branch. After 3 months or so the branch continues to produce similarly colored foliage. Flower color was unaffected. What are the factors that cause red to maroon tinted new growth?
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Stephen Hoy
Singularly Beautiful Roses
Warner Robins, GA

Don
Posts: 1888
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm

Re: foliage oddity

Post: # 62606Post Don
Wed Nov 25, 2015 5:26 pm

Just a guess but, from the appearance in the excellent photo you provided, it looks like a mutation affecting expression of one of the chlorophylls, probably chlorophyll A. If you were to try to root a cutting of the mutated stems they would certainly die because they cannot photosynthesize and so rely on sugars produced elsewhere in the plant.

It's an especially interesting mutation because it enables us to see the expression pattern for whichever anthocyanin is producing the red color. If you were to inspect these leaves under low power, 20-60 X, you would be able to see the granules that contain the anthocyanin pigment without obfuscation by chloroplasts (though, there may be white chloroplasts).
What doesn't kill them makes them stronger.

Karl K
Posts: 1368
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 4:49 pm

Re: foliage oddity

Post: # 62629Post Karl K
Mon Nov 30, 2015 3:25 pm

Very cool colors.
I once saw some chlorophyll-free suckers coming up from the base of a tree.
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Albino.jpg

Don
Posts: 1888
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 7:00 pm

Re: foliage oddity

Post: # 62630Post Don
Mon Nov 30, 2015 4:03 pm

What kind of a tree is that, not that it matters but I don't recognize the leaves except maybe beech?

If those are the result of a mutation it would have to have been long enough ago that there was lots of downstream growth to give that many suckers sharing the mutation. I wonder if it might not be some sort of chemical effect. Are there any herbicides that are chlorophyll inhibitors?
What doesn't kill them makes them stronger.

Karl K
Posts: 1368
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 4:49 pm

Re: foliage oddity

Post: # 62634Post Karl K
Tue Dec 01, 2015 7:59 am

Don wrote:What kind of a tree is that, not that it matters but I don't recognize the leaves except maybe beech?

If those are the result of a mutation it would have to have been long enough ago that there was lots of downstream growth to give that many suckers sharing the mutation. I wonder if it might not be some sort of chemical effect. Are there any herbicides that are chlorophyll inhibitors?
Don,
I didn't recognize the tree. It was growing in California, which should limit the suspects.

Around that time I also found similar albino shoots growing from a branch of an apple tree. Sadly, I didn't get a picture.

Albinos are also found in redwoods. I read a book about them, but never saw one in person.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albino_redwood
Karl

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