Misfit seedlings, anyone?

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philip_la
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Misfit seedlings, anyone?

Post: # 71135Post philip_la
Wed Feb 26, 2020 9:48 am

A watched seedling never grows and blooms, so while I patiently bide my time, I had thought it might be interesting to share images of seedlings that just don't do as expected when germinating.

*sigh* Unfortunately, my macro photography skills are evidently not up to the task, so pardon verbal descriptions of young oddities.

This year I do not yet have any peach-colored cotyledons, which, as I had feared, turned out to be caused by a complete lack of chlorophyll. It unfortunately did not resolve itself when the whitish first leaves appeared. (I suppose it wasn't realistic to even hope for a chimera at that stage in development, but I *had* hoped nonetheless...)

I do have one Tri-cotyledon this year (Tricot: Not just a fabric anymore.) I have to wonder how those lay together in the seed -- they are each of them now flat like normal paired cotyledons would be. I'm sure that type of growth will resolve itself quickly, but I will be interested to see if the subsequent phyllotaxy differs from the norm when the first several sets of leaves emerge. (Note to self: Label individual seedling.)

(Completely OT, but was it Joe B. who had the seedling that exhibited phyllotaxic arrangements along branches with visible spirals of thorns?)

One seedling has fused cotyledons. It looks like a duck-bill with lips, but what's interesting is that the first set of leaves are finding a different escape: a split at the base which is transverse to the suture which the corners of the "duck-lips" would imply. (That is to say, in the analogy, the leaves are emerging from the "sinus cavity" of said duck bill.)

The cotyledons of another seedling seem to have "petioles" which are twice the length of the cotyledons themselves. This seedling has lifted those cotyledons very high from which they break at the wrist and spread laterally. Rather flamboyant looking compared to its siblings. (I don't suppose the angle of the break would change at night, like the leaves of a prayer plant, but I should try to remember to check it out at night.)

And of course, I have the wide range of anthocyanins and other pigments in the radicals and cotyledons of all these sister seedlings.

I often wonder if *any* of these variations/anomolies hint at any features a mature plant might reveal. i used to get excited over e.g. darker pigmented radicals first emerging, hoping such might be indicative of a more pigmented plant down the road, but I've never monitored carefully enough to know if there is *any* merit to such enthusiasm.

Anybody have anything, such as their own misfit seedlings, worth sharing at this point yet?

I hope everyone is enjoying a good season with lots of promise for the spring!
Philip F.
[size=small][color=#669966]Zone 8 / Sunset Zn 30 (Austin, TX -- formerly New Orleans, LA)[/color][/size]

philip_la
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Re: Misfit seedlings, anyone?

Post: # 71220Post philip_la
Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:07 pm

Well, the seedling with the long petioles is acting in a manner that so far reminds me of descriptions of "foolish seedling disease" caused by the Gibberella fungus. I'm thinking it has a hormonal issue. Internodal lengths are quite long, as are the petioles. I hope it won't self-destruct as I'm curious to see further development.

The seedling with the fused cotyledons has yet to create dissected compound leaves -- they still resemble the first leaves to emerge.

I failed to label the seeds with heavy anthocyanins in cotyledons and radicals, but in the past, I have seen that roses with darker cooler leaves tend to create seedlings that emerge with more anthocyanins early on, so I'm inclined to think their might be some merit in such.

I hope folks are finding pleasant and affirming distractions from the other news in their own seedlings. Take care, everyone.
Philip F.
[size=small][color=#669966]Zone 8 / Sunset Zn 30 (Austin, TX -- formerly New Orleans, LA)[/color][/size]

Karl K
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Re: Misfit seedlings, anyone?

Post: # 71224Post Karl K
Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:48 pm

De Vries (1906) made a study of such monstrosities, selecting plants that produced the highest percentage. Some strains had 3, 4, even 5 cotyledons. Others had two cotyledons fused into a single organ. And other strangenesses. Alas, he made no mention of any associated traits -- beneficial or otherwise.
http://bulbnrose.x10.mx/Heredity/Devrie ... ities.html

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