Nematode resistance

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Karl K
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Nematode resistance

Post: # 68221Post Karl K
Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:56 pm

Rosa x fortuniana is famously resistant to nematodes. I was wondering whether the resistance was inherited from Banksiae, Laevigata or both. I found this. I assume that "Rosa laevigata Michx. anemoides" is 'anemonoides' = 'Anemone' or 'Ramona'.

Pratylenchus (Nematoda: Pratylenchidae): Diagnosis, Biology, Pathogenicity and Management, p. 384 (2007)
By Pablo Castillo, Nicola Vovlas

In Rosa spp., Coolen and Hendrickx (1972b) identified slight resistance to P. penetrans in one (R. eglanteria) out of 13 common commercial rose rootstocks in Belgium, showing that Rosa dumetorum Thuill., Rosa canina L. and Rosa multiflora Thunb. Ex Murr. were hosts, in descending order of host suitability, for P. penetrans under field conditions. Similarly, Santo and Lear (1976) showed that Rosa noisettiana Thory cv. Manetti rootstock was a good host of P. vulnus whereas R. multiflora was less suitable and Ohkawa and Saigusa (1981) found that Rosa chinensis Jacq. cv. Major and R. multiflora cv. 60-5 proved to be efficient hosts for P. vulnus and P. penetrans. Subsequently, R. multiflora cv. Ludiek was found to he resistant to P. vulnus (Schneider et al., 1995). Peng and Moens (2002a) detected partial resistance to P. penetrans in R. virginiana P. Mill. which supported significantly lower multiplication of the nematode than the control R. corymbifera cv. Laxa. Finally, Peng et al. (2003) screened 131 Rosa accessions and whilst the majority of accessions supported the multiplication of P. penetrans, resistance of R. multiflora cv. K1 and R. virginiana to P. penetrans was confirmed and Rosa laevigata Michx. anemoides supported a significantly low nematode population.

https://books.google.com/books?id=rmWxN ... &q&f=false

david zlesak
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Re: Nematode resistance

Post: # 68223Post david zlesak
Fri Aug 10, 2018 11:36 am

I haven't heard a lot about nematodes in roses in the North where I'm at and have the impression that Florida is particularly favorable to them and was the reason R. x fortuniana was used. Is that accurate? Do others throughout the South face nematode issues on roses?

On a side note, from my understanding part of the reason some of the ADR trial sites use marigolds between trials is to reduce/kill nematodes along with possibly problematic microbes. Marigolds supposed to exude some chemicals that negatively impact other organisms. It was interesting to see a field of tall marigolds where the Hannover ADR trial was going to be planted the following year.

srpshoy

Re: Nematode resistance

Post: # 68224Post srpshoy
Fri Aug 10, 2018 5:28 pm

No nematode issues in my yard here in middle GA (I do purchase some roses on fortuniana for the vigor it imparts). I work at a USDA research facility and we have some peach rootstocks developed specifically for nematode resistance - I'm guessing it becomes an issue over time in commercial peach orchards.
Stephen

Karl K
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Re: Nematode resistance

Post: # 68225Post Karl K
Sat Aug 11, 2018 10:47 am

david zlesak wrote:
Fri Aug 10, 2018 11:36 am
On a side note, from my understanding part of the reason some of the ADR trial sites use marigolds between trials is to reduce/kill nematodes along with possibly problematic microbes. Marigolds supposed to exude some chemicals that negatively impact other organisms. It was interesting to see a field of tall marigolds where the Hannover ADR trial was going to be planted the following year.
It really is amazing what sort of substances plants can secrete through their roots. These may alter the chemistry of the soil, allowing phosphates to be extracted from alkaline soil, or to protect root tips against aluminum poisoning in acid soil. Then there are various substances that attract beneficial fungi, and foster the growth of companion plants.
http://bulbnrose.x10.mx/Minerals/Dakora ... s2002.html

There is much to be learned about this subject, especially as to the inheritance of the various types of exudations. For example, what happens when we hybridize species with widely different habitats? If one species is native to alkaline soil, it may have a specialized ability to suck up phosphates. If we mate it with an acid-loving species, we should expect some interesting segregation in the F2 and later generations beyond mere flower color and growth habit.
Karl

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