RUBIGINOSA germination thesis

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henry kuska
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RUBIGINOSA germination thesis

Post: # 67169Post henry kuska
Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:53 pm

"EVALUATION OF SCARIFICATION AND STRATIFICATION TECHNIQUES IN BREAKING SEED DORMANCY AND DEVELOPMENT OF A REGENERATION PROTOCOL FOR ROSA RUBIGINOSA "

See:

http://41.204.187.24:8080/bitstream/han ... sAllowed=y

Plazbo
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Re: RUBIGINOSA germination thesis

Post: # 67171Post Plazbo
Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:12 pm

For a species that is a weed in most of south east Australia its interesting how low the germination rate they had in the article.

Larry Davis
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Re: RUBIGINOSA germination thesis

Post: # 67172Post Larry Davis
Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:30 pm

This was a well designed study but unfortunately there wasn't a "control" treatment known to have some success in germination. So it could be (unlikely) that the seeds were in fact non-viable. If I recall correctly, there was a test done some years ago down in TX where even an easy rose like Carefree Beauty gave terrible germination rates on filter paper. It think 100 seeds per petri dish is about 10 x too many. The ABA or other inhibitors don't get diluted, or sorbed well and so stay inhibitory. Maybe planting the seeds into some medium would give better results.

For rooting it may work better to apply only the rooting hormone and no nutrients. Some plants produce roots in response to nutrient deficiency and may be inhibited by excess. A lot of hardwood cuttings are done in "moist, sharp sand"

If someone can send me R rubiginosa seeds I will test nitrate. Willing to bet it works. But dried hips are more recalcitrant than freshly harvested with R canina. I know that. I have a study going which has run several years testing seeds kept dry at RT or cold, then treated in most vermiculite. Some day I have to stop and write it up. Fresh harvested seed gave up to 70% germ within 1 yr. Dried seeds takes longer and may require cold/warm/cold cycling to maximize germ rates.

Other species get better with time of storage dry. That has been published. One to 8 yr may do better than nearly new seed. R beggeriana was nearly as good at 1 yr dry as fresh harvest last year with nitrate . R souliana similarly did well in my experience. R rugosa several yr old does well, but it has almost no dormancy anyway.

Don
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Re: RUBIGINOSA germination thesis

Post: # 67173Post Don
Thu Feb 22, 2018 3:36 am

>> For rooting it may work better to apply only the rooting hormone and no nutrients. Some plants produce roots in response to nutrient deficiency and may be inhibited by excess. A lot of hardwood cuttings are done in "moist, sharp sand"

I was taught never to challenge a rooting cutting osmotically until the roots had already formed.
What doesn't kill them makes them stronger.

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