'Walter Schowalter' rose

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Paul G. Olsen
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'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66706Post Paul G. Olsen
Wed Dec 20, 2017 7:25 pm

Recently I was reading some of David Austin's book The English Roses (Third Edition, 2017). I was particularly interested in his account of breeding Rosa alba cultivars with modern roses. 'Shropshire Lass' was the first cultivar he developed of several and apparently more are to come.

I was thinking for cold climates (Zone 3), do we have something comparable to Rosa alba (likely R. gallica x R. canina) to use in a similar breeding program? Maybe Ed Robinson's 'Gay Centennial', but its stated parentage (Rosa gallica x 'Suzanne') may not be accurate. Regardless, there is one virtually unknown Canadian rose that should be used more in breeding programs with semi-hardy roses for this climate and it is 'Walter Schowalter' aka R.R. 3.

R.R. 3 refers to a supposedly 'Ross Rambler' (Rosa laxa) selection from seed sent to Mr. Schowalter from Percy Wright in the 1960's. It's not a Rosa laxa selection but perhaps a Rosa rugosa x 'Betty Bland' one. Mr. Wright worked a fair amount with 'Betty Bland' in his breeding programs. Of course, the mix up could also have happened at the other end.

'Walter Schowalter' is similar in appearance to 'Therese Bugnet' but has better quality flowers and foliage and the shrub is more disease resistant. The flowers have some fragrance. but they don't repeat their bloom. Used as a pistillate parent it's fertile and the seeds germinate readily. Diploid.

Last June I happened to see a 'Walter Schowalter' rose about 1.5 metres tall in full bloom growing in a 5 gal. container at Brentwood Bay Nursery, located near Victoria, B.C. The shrub actually came from me several years ago growing in the same container (yes, the shrub is very root bound). It was a spectacular sight to see, as beautiful a rose I've ever seen.

My priority is to cross 'Walter Schowalter' with 'John Davis' to maintain relatively good cold hardiness but also to develop progeny having very double flowers, which the latter cultivar is very capable of doing. 'Morden Centennial' and 'Campfire' would also likely be good to use as staminate parents, for example.

doug wild
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Location: Grande Prairie, Alberta Canada US Zone 2
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66708Post doug wild
Thu Dec 21, 2017 3:17 pm

"I was thinking for cold climates (Zone 3), do we have something comparable to Rosa alba (likely R. gallica x R. canina) to use in a similar breeding program? Maybe Ed Robinson's 'Gay Centennial', but its stated parentage (Rosa gallica x 'Suzanne') may not be accurate."

Paul...I've had the exact same thought when observing 'Gay Centennial'...those blue/gray/green leaves are a giveaway.

The only Alba I have worked with...alba semi-plena. It's very difficult to dilute that white color...and those downward pointing vicious thorns often show up in the seedlings. But the surprising parent hardiness is often passed on to it's progeny...ASP X r. acicularis seedling is also as hardy as r. acicularis. with a great fragrance.

Two F1 offspring:
Attachments
ASP X r. acicularis.JPG
ASP X r. acicularis
minature seedling X ASP.JPG
Minature seedling X ASP
alba semi plena.jpg
ASP on East side of house...5m in height

doug wild
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66711Post doug wild
Fri Dec 22, 2017 2:24 pm

I've also tried to emulate some of Rolf Siever's Alba combinations using Crimson Glory (yielding his beautiful cultivar Crimson Blush).
https://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=2.1374

So I crossed alba semi-plena with Crimson Glory (pistillate parent). This F1 seedling was the result...but I haven't given up...it is a respectable seedling...just a work in progress. This seedling is surprisingly hardy and I must admit that I find these novel genetic lines more thrilling to work with than using Parkland or Explorer cultivars.
Attachments
ASP X Crimson Glory.JPG
ASP X Crimson Glory

tsilvers
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66725Post tsilvers
Tue Dec 26, 2017 7:08 am

I like your "works in progress" enough to grow them for their own sake! Nice work Doug!

aimbeault
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66757Post aimbeault
Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:36 pm

I think that you have a good point Paul when you say that RR 3 is perhaps a Rosa rugosa x Betty Bland cross, and I think that RR 14 is from this same cross. I have also RR 4 and RR 6 and both of them have evident similarities with R. laxa contrary of two others: small foliage, long spiny stems and elongated fruits. Below are some photos of plants obtained from RR 3 crosses with Lac Majeau, Thérèse Bugnet, Louise Bugnet and Prairie Peace. Except for the last, the three Bugnet’s roses have about 50% thornless stems and for those of RR 3 x Louise Bugnet (11oo-2), they are 90% thornless. I made last summer crosses with RR 3 and RR 14 in both directions; eight flowers have been pollinated on each plant. I sowed 525 seeds (66 seeds/fruit) of RR 3 x RR 14, and 261 seeds (37 seeds/fruit) from the cross of RR 14 x RR 3. All are now in cold stratification after 12 warm weeks. I am curious to see what will happen with those crosses.
Attachments
(11NN) RR 3 x Thérèse Bugnet.JPG
(11NN) RR 3 x Thérèse Bugnet.JPG
(13W) Lac Majeau x RR 3.JPG
(13W) Lac Majeau x RR 3.JPG
(15X) RR 3 x Prairie Peace.JPG
(15X) RR 3 x Prairie Peace.JPG
André
Est du Québec, Canada, zone 3b.

aimbeault
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66758Post aimbeault
Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:39 pm

Two more photos...!
Attachments
(11oo-1) RR 3 x Louise Bugnet.JPG
(11oo-1) RR 3 x Louise Bugnet.JPG
(11oo-2) RR 3 x Louise Bugnet.JPG
(11oo-2) RR 3 x Louise Bugnet.JPG
André
Est du Québec, Canada, zone 3b.

Margit Schowalter
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Location: Alberta, Canada
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66766Post Margit Schowalter
Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:32 pm

Andre
Wonderful crosses and wonderful pictures. I really like RR 3 x Louise Bugnet. How does it do on very hot days?

Paul G. Olsen
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66769Post Paul G. Olsen
Sun Jan 07, 2018 10:39 pm

Doug,

The Rosa alba semi-plena x R. acicularis selection of yours - very good work and the type of rose breeding I really like to see being done in northern climates to advance the development of roses to grow in them. That is, species or near species crosses leading to new types or selections that can be injected into modern roses to increase cold hardiness, add disease resistance or develop new shrub forms. All one has to do is look at the example of Frank Sinner's 'Suzanne' (combining Rosa spinosissima and R. laxa) developed in 1950 to see the enormous influence it's had in developing roses, many that can be grown in a Zone 3 climate. More than 250 descendants of this rose cultivar I believe. It's unfortunate that Percy Wright's 'Hazeldean' because of its yellow colour wasn't also combined with Rosa laxa many years ago, but I've had the opportunity to work on that and will continue to do it.

Andre,

Also very good work with your efforts breeding 'Walter Schowalter' (RR3). I trust you will continue working with this rose cultivar. As I've indicated I think it's got much potential developing roses for Zone 3 climates and you have clearly shown it has.

aimbeault
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Re: 'Walter Schowalter' rose

Post: # 66794Post aimbeault
Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:41 am

Thank you Margit and Paul for your appreciation.

Margit, last summer RR 3 x Louise Bugnet #1 was less floriferous and had yellowish foliage, in comparison of the years before. Maybe it was because of hot days that we have had effectively, but I am not sure. I will see if those problems reappear this summer and if it is because of hot weather.

Paul, for sure I will continue working with RR 3 and RR 14, and others old Canadian roses, it was my aim when I have begun hybridizing. As you say, they have many things to offer and I think that interesting plants can be obtained. I think I am on a good road with those results.
André
Est du Québec, Canada, zone 3b.

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