Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

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Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

Postby Rob Byrnes » Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:06 pm

Does anyone know of a source for this one?
Rob Byrnes

Historic Village of Roebling, NJ Zone 7a
On the right bank of the Delaware River
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Re: Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

Postby hoy127 » Sat Oct 14, 2017 12:06 am

I believe I got my last plant from Roses Unlimited.
Stephen
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Re: Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

Postby Rob Byrnes » Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:34 am

What is you overall opinion of this rose Stephen?
Rob Byrnes

Historic Village of Roebling, NJ Zone 7a
On the right bank of the Delaware River
Rob Byrnes
 
Posts: 1478
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 3:34 pm

Re: Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

Postby hoy127 » Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:57 pm

Subject to BS in my garden. Lots of hips. Fertile. Offspring generally strongly resemble momma. Check out R. Rippetoe's Roses Bred list. I think he's had similar results.
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Re: Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

Postby Rob Byrnes » Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:59 pm

Thank you for relating your experience with it. I’ll check out Robert’s list.
Rob Byrnes

Historic Village of Roebling, NJ Zone 7a
On the right bank of the Delaware River
Rob Byrnes
 
Posts: 1478
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 3:34 pm

Re: Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

Postby Karl K » Thu Oct 19, 2017 9:03 am

hoy127 wrote:Subject to BS in my garden. Lots of hips. Fertile. Offspring generally strongly resemble momma. Check out R. Rippetoe's Roses Bred list. I think he's had similar results.

Reading the article, I was immediately struck by the statement, "Rippetoe had learned, however, warmer weather increases the chances of producing dissimilar hybrids even though it reduces overall fertility, so in some ways the heat might work in his favor."
http://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/ezi ... tionID=898

This is an important observation that has some independent verification.

Genetic control of self-incompatibility and reproductive development in flowering plant (1994) p. 386
Gametophytic competition and selection
J. I. Hormazza and M. Herrero

Isozyme analysis of backcross progeny of Lycopersicon esculentum (cold sensitive) and Lycopersicon hirsutum (cold tolerant) derived from pollinations at normal and low temperature showed that gametes with a particular chromosomal segment from L. hirsutum were favored over those with the corresponding L. esculentum segment in fertilization at low temperatures (Zamir et al. 1982). Further work (Zamir and Vallejos 1983) showed that the selection pressure was higher during pollen tube growth than during pollen development. Finally, Zamir and Gadish (1987) demonstrated that progeny from crosses made at low temperatures had better cold adaptation, evaluated by root growth, than progeny from crosses made at higher temperatures. Using pollen mixtures of several Lycopersicon species, Lyakh (1992) has shown that pollen from cold tolerant species is more competitive for fertilization at low temperatures than pollen from cold sensitive species. Schön et al. (1991) crossed winter and spring Hordeum cultivars and compared control F2's with F2's derived from F1 plants self‑pollinated at low temperatures. Segregation distortion in favor of the cold tolerant cultivar was observed at one locus although further studies are necessary to determine if that segregation distortion is correlated with an increase of sporophytic cold tolerance.

It often happens that related species are pollinated, in the wild, at different seasons or different times of day. Desert plants, for example, are often pollinated around dawn or dusk when water stress is at a minimum. When mated with other species or cultivars that are naturally pollinated during the day, we may observe this segregation distortion in later generations.

Also, pollen tubes may favor lower or higher temperatures. Takatsu et al. (2001) found that the pollen tubes of Gladiolus tristis grew fastest at about 20C, and that pollination was most effective at 15C. In prior experiments, pollination by G. tristis resulted in seeds that would not germinate. The experimenter was obliged to excise the embryos and culture them artificially.
http://bulbnrose.x10.mx/Heredity/PollenTemp2001.html
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Re: Innocence hybrid tea (Chaplin 1921)

Postby Rob Byrnes » Thu Oct 19, 2017 9:34 am

Thank you for the information Karl! I thought that if I could find this one I thought i’d Like to try it based on the parentage but learning that it is bs prone I’d skip this one. Thanks again.

Rob
Rob Byrnes

Historic Village of Roebling, NJ Zone 7a
On the right bank of the Delaware River
Rob Byrnes
 
Posts: 1478
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 3:34 pm


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