I wonder if this applies to roses

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henry kuska
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I wonder if this applies to roses

Post: # 66339Post henry kuska
Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:08 am

" This led to greater seed production in the altered plants..."

See:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 120318.htm

Larry Davis
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Re: I wonder if this applies to roses

Post: # 66349Post Larry Davis
Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:45 pm

Maybe that's why deadheading works well. I've noticed that even sterile plants often do better at blooming if you cut off the failed flowers. For instance the Knock Out roses seem to send more rapid laterals when trimmed. That is even though the sterile tissue might be photosynthetically productive. I have been amazed to see how our university grounds crew can use electric clippers on something like Sunrise-Sunset and spur a whole new flush by whacking them back a foot or more. My neighbors did the same on Home Run. I would be willing to wager that the total dry matter production is higher on the pruned bushes.

It is really hard to design a true comparison experiment on this because total nutrient and water use will vary a lot between treatments. So do you use unlimited water and nutrients, or just what is needed by the pruned shrub? Do they end up with more unshaded leaves contributing, while the unpruned have a lot of less productive shaded tissue? Are we simply tapping into stored reserves in the roots or really increasing total biomass? We'd have to do a sacrificial experiment which gets a bit costly to arrange and manage. Needs something like 2 dozen plants for 3 reps at 4 times each of pruned vs unpruned if you intend to do the pruning more than once per mid-season.

But you could do a simple deadheading expt with perhaps 6 plants where you just remove each flower as it opens on one set and leave them to fade on the other. Then check wt at end of season. Use something almost totally sterile so seed production per se is not a factor. Of course hormones might be, even if most seeds don't take.

henry kuska
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Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:06 pm
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Re: I wonder if this applies to roses

Post: # 66350Post henry kuska
Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:00 pm

I would be especially interested to see if the cut roses:
1) are more disease resistant.

2) produce more seeds.

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