Leaflet rooting

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Leaflet rooting

Postby roseseek » Wed Dec 14, 2016 12:56 am

This was recently posted on Garden Web. Someone put in a rose cutting to root and a leaflet fell off and rooted. Not something I've ever seen before, but quite neat!
http://forums2.gardenweb.com/discussion ... ttings?n=2
Kim
California Central Coast
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Cooler inland coastal valley with strong marine influence
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby Kevin Brownlee » Wed Dec 14, 2016 2:38 am

Yikes! I'm afraid to go sleep for fear of waking up in a forest of Raindrops! I'm surprised the plant would drop a leaflet with enough reserves to establish itself separately. I wonder if that decision was made for it accidentally. Either way, what were the chances?
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby david zlesak » Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:41 am

Hi Kim!!

That is really fun!! With the black spot work we do, we take full leaves off of roses and put them in clear salad boxes with moist paper towel and spray them with specific strains of black spot spores to look for infection and incubate them for 2 weeks. If the leaf stays in good shape we have gotten really nice roots starting by about 2 weeks sometimes. I tried to pot them up and nurse them along. It seems very difficult to get shoots to regenerate. I've tried some drops of the hormone cytokinin which helps with shoot regeneration and so far it hasn't been enough to push them to make shoots. It would be great if we could coax stems out :0).
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby roseseek » Wed Dec 14, 2016 1:07 pm

Hi David, thank you! That is really interesting. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could figure out how to make this work?
Kim
California Central Coast
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Sunset Zone 15
Cooler inland coastal valley with strong marine influence
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby david mears » Wed Dec 14, 2016 3:30 pm

Kim or David, if you were to take a bud which is still attached to the leaf as if you were going to bud/graft it, might this work.
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in Australia.[/color]
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby roseseek » Wed Dec 14, 2016 3:39 pm

Hi David. You can root one bud cuttings. That's one of the things Ralph Moore was experimenting with late in Sequoia's run. It takes a lot more time to produce a retail ready plant from one bud, but it can be done. Many years ago, I struck a dozen cuttings of International Herald Tribune at The Huntington and removed thirteen rooted plants from the mister pot. The single bud at the bottom of one cutting had thrown a small root and broke off the cutting when I potted them individually. I carefully potted that single bud and put it where I hoped it wouldn't be unearthed until my next trip out. It grew into a perfect own root plant. I would suggest a lot of the success with such things depends highly on the viability of the variety and its ability to root easily and grow well own root. Once you have those two characteristics fixed, the rest just requires experimentation to figure out the most successful method to accomplish it.
Kim
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Sunset Zone 15
Cooler inland coastal valley with strong marine influence
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby SimonV » Wed Dec 14, 2016 4:25 pm

Propagating from single buds is a technique I use to teach kids the basics of tissue culture using potato plants. We obtain potato explants from a local tissue culture lab and then go through the process of sterilisation, etc, to prep sections of stem containing just a single axillary bud. No special treatment is needed as potatoes strike very easily from cuttings and in less than 2 weeks we have our own explants ready to divide up further.

I applied the same process (no promoters of any kind... just a normal MS medium) to rose sections containing just one bud and it failed completely under tissue culture conditions and I came to the conclusion that roses require more promoters than potatoes do.

Then I tried an experiment at home using my recently registered mini/poly called 'Fifty Shades of Pink'. Here are the photos:

These are the cuttings. They are approximately 1cm long.
[attachment=2]microprop2.jpg[/attachment]

They were wrapped up in paper towel moistened with boiled water.
[attachment=2]microprop2.jpg[/attachment]

This photo, dated the 26/3/2014, shows the callousing that had occurred and the failures due to rot/fungus.
[attachment=2]microprop2.jpg[/attachment]

These calloused sections were potted into normal potting mix and the shoots began to break. They took off like normal cuttings and I still have some of the plants now 2 years later.
Attachments
microprop4.jpg
Callousing - 26th March, 2014
microprop1.jpg
Buds wrapped in moist paper towel and sealed in ziplock bag - 9th March, 2014.
microprop2.jpg
One-bud cuttings of 'Fifty Shades of Pink' - 9th March 2014
Last edited by SimonV on Wed Dec 14, 2016 8:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby SimonV » Wed Dec 14, 2016 4:26 pm

[attachment=0]microprop6.jpg[/attachment]

If I had of practised better aseptic techniques I am sure the success rate would have been higher. I was trying to demonstrate to someone that his argument that grafting produces more plants, faster, might not necessarily be true if ease of propagation and ownroot vigour was selected for at the seedling stage. 'Fifty Shades of Pink' was a cross between 'Temple Bells' and a floribunda (tag was lost) so wichurana features strongly in it to specifically target own root vigour and easy propagation.
Attachments
microprop6.jpg
Shoot break in microprop experiment - 8th April, 2014
Last edited by SimonV on Wed Dec 14, 2016 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby Larry Davis » Wed Dec 14, 2016 8:21 pm

There are actually publications on single bud cuttings and how to propagate them. Back in the 1980s, from maybe Holland or France. I did it with my Little Yellow Beauty when I first saw it bloom a couple times under lights. Every one grew into a regular plant under lights. Each cutting had one leaf and 1-2 inch of stem. LYB came from Rise N Shine a Moore creation so no big surprise. If I weren't so lazy I'd look up the citation.

At the time I was using single trifoliate leaf cuttings of soybean to study nodulation. Those root fine, last many weeks, but with no axillary bud never yield a bigger plant. Published by a group in Missouri that did tissue culture of soybean.
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby Rob Byrnes » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:34 pm

Is it at the point when the callous develops that the cutting is put in soil or do roots develop from the callous and then put in soil?
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby SimonV » Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:30 pm

In some varieties you will often not catch them in time to pot up before roots have formed. If I catch them in time I try to pot them up at the callous stage to allow them to form roots without being disturbed.

I should also note that the cuttings are very prone to desiccation at this stage and I tend to lose quite a few that seem to just dehydrate and die. It's almost as if the callous material is quite ineffective at taking up water and the cuttings need to form roots as quickly as possible at this stage to ensure they can take up water properly.

This is the stage I pot up at:
Attachments
callousing.jpg
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby Larry Davis » Sat Dec 17, 2016 12:18 am

If I remember right, people regenerating roses from callus move them at the early rooting stage to new jars, then have to make the transition to exposed culture. Coating the leaves with 50 % glycerol seems to prevent such rapid dehydration. Never did it myself but seems to me that someone at U of Wisconsin was doing this in early 80s.
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby chuckp » Sat Dec 17, 2016 5:57 am

Hi simonV,
Forgive me, what plant zone do yo live in and what are your objectives in taking cuttings this way as opposed
at just starting soft wood cuttings?
This fall when I was putting my breeding stock to bed, I few branches broke off. I cut the branches up like yours
in the photo and wrapped them in moistened paper towel inside a Ziploc bag and stuck them in the fridge.
When I've done this before, the cutting always seem to rot in storage. I noticed that all the leaves have been removed
From your cuttings.
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby SimonV » Sat Dec 17, 2016 6:50 am

There are no leaves because it is done during winter and if there are any leaves left I remove them. I do it this way because it is quick and very easy. It doesn't take up a lot of space and I can do a very large number in one go. This method has never worked for me during the warmer months (9B). I don't use the fridge. I just wrap them in moist newspaper, put the newspaper into a plastic shopping bag, and then sit it on a shelf out of the sun indoors and forget about them for 2-3 weeks. When they've calloused up like this I then pot them up or stick them directly in the ground in rows. Some varieties will callous up like this in just 9 days whilst others can take their time. It doesn't work for all varieties.. but the ones it doesn't work for.. I don't want to use in breeding anyway ;)
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby roseseek » Sat Dec 17, 2016 11:40 am

If you're experiencing the cuttings molding, turning black or gray fuzzy in the wraps, your paper is too wet. Remove the foliage before wrapping as the leaves will mold and begin rotting, leading to the wood rotting. I pot at the callus stage, too, unless they have rooted, then I pot as I would before rooting. And, because I live in a high evaporation environment, I plant them deeply in the foam cups (16 oz.) I use because they are a useful size, readily available and inexpensive (yes, I poke many drain holes in each cup). I cut them to fit the depth of the cup prior to wrapping so when they come out, they fit what I want. Initially, I place the callus about an inch above the bottom of the cup, so when filled, there is about an inch of stem protruding from the soil, then water in well and leave them alone in the filtered to partial sun. It is very easy to slip the whole soil ball from the cup occasionally to see how the root development is progressing. Once the bottom of the cup is filled, I slide out the root ball, place several inches of soil in the cup then insert the root ball into the cup on top of the fresh soil, then gently push the soil from around the cutting into the cup to firm in the roots so the cutting is lifted higher. By starting them off with only an inch or so exposed to the elements, they are pretty much hardened off by this time and usually continue developing normally.
Kim
California Central Coast
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Sunset Zone 15
Cooler inland coastal valley with strong marine influence
roseseek
 
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Re: Leaflet rooting

Postby Kevin Brownlee » Fri Jan 06, 2017 7:42 pm

I stumbled upon this 1869 reference to rooting rose leaflets. Apparently, it was a familiar exercise.
Attachments
Screenshot_20170106-151753.png
From "Parsons on the Rose" - 1869
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