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How common is this?

Posted: Sun Aug 24, 2014 9:08 pm
by chuckp
In 2001 I collected and germinated some open pollenated seeds of The Canadian Explorer rose George Vancouver.
From the beginning this seedling was a little different. While the other seedlings grew tall and leggy like its parent, this one stayed dwarfed.
The leaves and petals are very much like GV, but it grows only about 8 to 10 inches.

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Mon Aug 25, 2014 8:01 am
by Rob Byrnes
I'm not sure but I really like it.

Rob

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Mon Aug 25, 2014 10:27 am
by Paul G Olsen
Charles,

I think this is a valuable selection, possibily for introduction and certainly for further breeding. It reminds me somewhat of 'Louis Jolliet', which is compact and quite low growing (generally about 60 cm. tall), in a Zone 3 climate. Interestingly, your op 'George Vancouver' (probably selfed), as you may know, has the same pistillate parent (L83) as 'Louis Jolliet'.

By the way, I also like your (apparently) 'Carefree Beauty' x Rosa arkansana selection, although my preference is to see a hybrid of this cultivar with Rosa acicularis. Hopefully, I'll have selections of 'Winnipeg Parks' x Rosa acicularis next year, but my preference is to use 'Carefree Beauty' with this species. Don't ask me why!

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Mon Aug 25, 2014 10:44 am
by jbergeson
Yes, combining a dwarf stature with acceptable vigor, hardiness, and rebloom is a very good thing.

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:51 am
by Rob Byrnes
Chuck,

Do you still have this seedling and if so, can you give us an update? I have two Frontenac seedlings that are similar to your seedling.

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 7:45 am
by chuckp
Hi Rob,
Here are some seedlings from Geo.van-op-01 crosses. This seedling is fertile both ways.
Chuckp

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 6:07 pm
by dgermeys
Do you know the roses 'Little Pet' and 'Félicité-Perpétue'? The last one is a climber, the first one is a mutation from it and and a mini rose, Félicité-Perpétue is only blooming once, while "Little Pet" is flowering all the time.

Most of the dwarf roses flower continuously...

So there are a few possibilities. Not sure what happened. It is interesting though to notice that George Vancouver has a lot of rosa wichurana genes. I believe the answer could be found in that wild rose, but I'm not sure why.

Very interesting rose you got there. Is is also a healthy rose? and hardy? How tall do the seedlings become?

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:09 am
by chuckp
Thanks for your comments Dane.
It's hard to believe that almost 20 years have passed since I discovered this rose. I think its important for folks breeding roses for cold climates, not to be too quick to dispose of seedlings. Let mother nature point the way.
Geo. Van OP-01 stands about 10 inches with semi-glossy foliage.
Here are a few more seedlings. The offspring are from a few inches tall to 3 feet tall.

Re: How common is this?

Posted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 4:45 am
by Plazbo
dgermeys wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 6:07 pm
Do you know the roses 'Little Pet' and 'Félicité-Perpétue'? The last one is a climber, the first one is a mutation from it and and a mini rose, Félicité-Perpétue is only blooming once, while "Little Pet" is flowering all the time.

Most of the dwarf roses flower continuously...
related observation

Of the numerous Baby Faurax seedlings I've got growing, I assume the majority are selfed seeing as it's surrounded by rugosa's and no evidence of their influence (ie seedlings are low thorn, non rugose foliage, etc). The ones that flowered are more dwarf and less vigorous, the ones that haven't bloomed are very vigorous (ie their growth rate is inline with species like woodsii and palustris seedlings) and appear to be climbers.