William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

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dave wolfe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25822Post dave wolfe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Chianti is an impressive plant here (z5): tall upright plant covered with fragrant, well-formed blooms is June, hips in fall; completely hardy; suckers some but not much; the only Austin remaining in our garden.

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25825Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Hmmm....thanks all for offering various descriptions re: 'Chianti' based on your climates, and breeding experiences!

Simon (Australia)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25829Post Simon (Australia)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Keeping in mind that when they say 'Chianti' needs extra cold... it isn't going to get that in Sydney LOL

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25830Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Too right, Simon.

Robert Neil Rippetoe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25831Post Robert Neil Rippetoe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

I had 'Constance Spry' here several years before I finally gave up. It simply refused to flower.

It did however, grow like a weed.

paul barden

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25832Post paul barden
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Yeah, I wouldn't attempt to grow 'Chianti' in a climate any warmer than mine. The Gallicas in general don't perform as well here as they do in colder climates where they get many more hours of chill. Here, they do OK, but they don't make the same massive displays, nor is bloom quality as good. The Gallica-China hybrids do better. ('Hippolyte', 'Duchesse de Montebello', etc) The best plant of 'Chianti' I ever saw was in a zone 4b or 5a, where it spent four months of the year buried up to its waist in snow.

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25833Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

What is your USDA climate zone Robert...?

Robert Neil Rippetoe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25834Post Robert Neil Rippetoe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

9 or 10 depending on the year.

This year definitely 10. We've hardly had any Winter at all.

I still have Plumeria with leaves on them. The Bananas still look great.

Robert Neil Rippetoe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25835Post Robert Neil Rippetoe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Btw, fyi, I've experimented with stripping the leaves off of those that wouldn't blossom in the past to see if it helped induce dormancy. It seems to have made no difference.

Checking today I noted that I have flower buds forming on "Secunda" for the first time. There are also buds forming on 'Manipur Magic'.

The mild Winter is moving things along. I should have first blossoms from 2009 crosses in the next few weeks.

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25836Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

lol... we both live in a harsh climate zone for most roses, Robert.

Summer heat here combined with several days of drenching rain have given a tropical feel here lately...most uncomfortable weather!

The snail bait around my newly sprouted rose seedlings is growing furry mould over it, at a faster rate than the seedlings are growing.

:0)

Robert Neil Rippetoe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25837Post Robert Neil Rippetoe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

George, actually we have great climate zones for roses but we can't expect to grow all the same roses those do in cold Winter climates, or for even those that grow and flower to perform in the same way.

'Westerland' is a great example. I look forward to hearing how it does for you there.

Strangely enough some very hardy types do thrive here and I've had good luck hybridizing with them.

I'm guessing the Teas would do better for you than they do for me. They seem to enjoy humidity.

I live in a mild climate but most of the year humidity is quite low.

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25838Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

My enquiry regarding 'Chianti' was purely out of interest in the cultivar, after all it is relevant to the breeding of WS2000. Outside of that, I was NOT contemplating on ever growing it here in Sydney, nor would I ever grow 'Constance Spry' here. Both are too close to Gallica ancestry to expect much out of them in this microclimate.

The Teas are a mixed bag here as far as performance goes, Robert. Some do dreadfully here in the heat and humidity, and others are evergreen and thrive. The group is too diverse to generalise about, IMO.


Robert Neil Rippetoe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25840Post Robert Neil Rippetoe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Nice to know George. I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one who has trouble with some of the Teas.

'Lorraine Lee' was not good here but was strangely very fertile as pollen parent. I only used it for a very short time one Spring.

Descendants do better but all mildew to some degree.

See link for example.

Link: www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=21.136557

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25841Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Hmmm.. That's interesting work, and observations you have there, Robert.


George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25842Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

'Lorraine Lee' (Tea/Gigantea) does very very well here in Sydney, it flowers into winter and keeps a lot of its foliage in winter, from memory (I never pay much attention to it, as it is one of those roses you tend to see too much of here, and "get over it" as it were..lol). It seems to love the local climate and soil chemistry.


Robert Neil Rippetoe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25843Post Robert Neil Rippetoe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

"It seems to love the local climate and soil chemistry."

George, I figured it was good where you are. That's the reason I used it as example.

It's interesting that it's so good for you and yet it suffered much of the year here from the low humidity and high heat.

Location makes all the difference.

I also want to point out the seedling I linked is a triploid x diploid cross.

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25844Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

Have you had a chance to assess RBXLOL for fertility, Robert?

Robert Neil Rippetoe

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25845Post Robert Neil Rippetoe
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

It sets OP hips and they contain seed. I'm sure it's fertile.

The growth habit is open and floppy. If I carry it forward I'll probably try it with a mini to try to increase branching.

Winter flowering is good which is one of the things I'm breeding for. Too many roses and too many tangents to explore.

We'll see.

George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25846Post George, (Sydney Australia zone 10a/b equiv.)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

good luck :0)

Simon (Australia)

Re: William Shakespeare 2000... is it fertile?

Post: # 25847Post Simon (Australia)
Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:00 am

I have hips forming on 'Lorraine Lee' this year with 'Mutabilis'. I was looking at increasing the branching with this.

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